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Pub Excimer

Abstracts of Selected Publications:

Results of Excimer Laser Photorefractive Keratectomy for the Correction of Myopia
Ezra Maguen, MD, James J. Salz, MD, Anthony B. Nesburn, MD, Cathy Warren RN, CRNO,
Johnathan I. Macy, MD, Thanassis Papaioannou, MSc, John Hofbauer, MD, Michael S. Berlin, MD

PURPOSE: This report summarizes the authors' 3-year experience with excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy on 240 eyes of 161 patients.
METHODS: With constant laser emission parameters, nitrogen flow across the cornea was used on 79 eyes, whereas 161 eyes had no nitrogen flow. Of the 240 eyes, 74 were operated on without suction ring fixation. Postoperative pain management included patching and oral analgesics in 77 eyes and the use of topical diclofenac or ketorolac and a therapeutic soft contact lens in 163 eyes. Follow-up ranged from 1 month (206 eyes) to 36 months (10 eyes).
RESULTS: At 3 months, 88% (144 eyes) had uncorrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better; 86% (151 eyes) had corrected visual acuity to within ±1 diopter of intended correction and 10% (17 eyes) lost two or more lines of best-corrected visual acuity. At 12 months, 89% (122 eyes) achieved uncorrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better, 79% (115 eyes) had corrected visual acuity to within ±1 diopter of intended correction, and 4% (6 eyes) lost two or more lines of best-corrected visual acuity. At 24 months, 92% (44 of 48 eyes) had uncorrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better, 86% (44 of 51 eyes) had corrected visual acuity to within ±1 diopter of intended correction, and 5% (2 eyes) lost two or more lines of best-corrected visual acuity. At 36 months, 90% (9 eyes) achieved an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better, 90% (9 eyes) had corrected visual acuity to within ±1 diopter of intended correction, and no eyes lost two or more lines of best-corrected visual acuity.
CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained with one procedure are within accepted standards of accuracy for refractive surgery, and there is the potential for refinement of the final optical correction. Complication rates are low and are not vision threatening. They included increased intraocular pressure, epithelial "map dot" changes, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome, "central islands," and others. Photorefractive keratectomy appears to be a safe procedure over the short and medium term.

OPHTHALMOLOGY, Vol. 101, No. 9, September, 1994

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